Uganda

UGANDA

Between 2013 and 2017, the ECLT Foundation implements a project in Uganda’s Hoima District, where almost 13% of households grow tobacco and 8,000 children have been identified as being involved in child labour. The project provides children and families from over 18,000 households with reliable access to:

  • Basic Services
  • Quality Education
  • Sustainable Income

WHO BENEFITED FROM OUR PROGRAMMES IN UGANDA
FROM 2013?

CHILDREN

69,325

ADULTS

76,383

GETTING CHILDREN
OUT OF CHILD LABOUR

The ECLT Foundation identifies vulnerable children and adopts a comprehensive approach to keep them away from child labour:

  • the ECLT Foundation withdraws children who are engaged in child labour;
  • it prevents children at risk of entering child labour; and
  • it protects children who are by law old enough to work but who should not do tasks that are harmful to their health, safety and well-being.

Children taken out of child labour

ACTUAL

69325

TARGET (August 2017)

64680

SUCCESS STORY

“My dream was to become a mechanic.”

EDUCATING CHILDREN

By providing education opportunities and infrastructure for schools, the ECLT Foundation helps give children a better chance to succeed in life – a means to escape poverty, training for a job that uses their gifts and talents, and someday, an income to support their own children so that they can end the vicious cycle of child labour. 

Children enrolled at school

ACTUAL

2740

TARGET (August 2017)

2,940

Children receiving uniforms and school materials

Once well-equipped and supported, children can fully participate in school.

ACTUAL

27913

TARGET (August 2017)

5,600

Teens who are in or have graduated from vocational training

Through vocational trainings and apprenticeships, Uganda’s youth acquire skills to get a job and earn an income that can help them live the life they want.

ACTUAL

240

TARGET

240

98% of teens now employed or self-employed

RAISING AWARENESS

People trained on child labour issues

By providing education opportunities and infrastructure for schools, the ECLT Foundation helps give children a better chance to succeed in life – a means to escape poverty, training for a job that uses their gifts and talents, and someday, an income to support their own children so that they can end the vicious cycle of child labour. 

With its partners, the ECLT Foundation conducts awareness-raising activities including campaigns, parent and teacher committees, workshops, calendars, publications, radio talk shows and radio dramas.

ACTUAL

39132

TARGET (August 2017)

20,500

Murals are a useful visual advocacy tools. UWESO proposes under the new project extension to contract a designer to repaint Murals developed in 14 schools, 3 trading centers and other public places in Hoima District. These will be aimed at raising awareness on child labour, prevention and promotion of education. This has advantages because murals are permanent paintings on the walls; are sustainable, and can stay for long period of time (over 5 years). These murals are unique because they can provide children an opportunity to express themselves and raise awareness about child labour through art.

STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES

SUCCESS STORY

United against child labour in agriculture in Uganda

In May 2016, over 120 stakeholders gathered in Uganda’s Hoima District to launch the District Action Plan on Child Labour – the first of its kind throughout the sub-Saharan region – to effectively address the root causes of child labour under the Ugandan National Action Plan to Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labour.

Participants represented Ugandan ministries; national and Hoima District-level officials; the US Department of Labor; academia; worker and employer organizations from Uganda; agriculture company representatives from tobacco, sugar and tea; civil society; and parents and children from the district where the Uganda project is working.

The discussions between stakeholders and sectors succeeded in promoting greater alignment, operational commitments and resources needed for the sustainable implementation of the District Action Plan.

ALLEVIATING POVERTY

Poverty is one of the key root causes of child labour. The ECLT Foundation works with communities to increase economic opportunities for families so they can better deal with this everyday struggle.

Parents saving money and accessing loans through Village Savings and Loan Groups

ACTUAL

TARGET (August 2017)

20736

20,500

VSLA members in Uganda

VSLA groups are especially empowering for the women in the community, as they often rely on men for financial support. These groups allow women to access to savings and loans for the first time, and this often leads to new income opportunities.

77% women

23% men

Households trained in starting a business

Beneficiaries receive basic business trainings to start and manage sustainable household income generating activities (IGAs). Possible IGAs include bee keeping, animal rearing, poultry, and energy saving technologies.

ACTUAL

25769

TARGET (August 2017)

20,500

SUCCESS STORY

“With the VSLA, I founded my own business to ensure my family survives.”

Alinaitwe Scovia, 42, lives in the Hoima District, Uganda, with her 6 children ages 4 to 18 years old. When her husband died, she did not have enough time to continue with tobacco growing and had to look for other livelihoods to ensure the family’s survival. In 2013, she joined the Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) in her community, created with support of the ECLT Foundation. With her savings, she borrowed UGX 1,000,000 (US$ 288) and decided to launch her own second hand clothing business.

“With this loan, I started to sell clothes in the evenings or at weekly markets in Kigorobya. With experiences other women shared with me, I know how to make simple records for my business, how to keep customers and how to understand if I made profits.”

During the morning, Alinaitwe does subsistence farming. “I am happy with what I am doing because I can support my children to go to school, have meals and clothes, and medical care when they fall sick.”